Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12857/115177
Title: Nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells reside in adult spinal cord meninges and participate in injury-induced parenchymal reaction
Authors: Decimo, Ilaria 
Bifari, Francesco
Rodriguez, Francisco Javier
Malpeli, Giorgio 
Dolci, Sissi
Lavarini, Valentina
Pretto, Silvia
Vasquez, Sandra
Sciancalepore, Marina
Montalbano, Alberto
Berton, Valeria 
Krampera, Mauro 
Fumagalli, Guido
Keywords: Meninges;Neural stem cells;Spinal cord injury;Stem cell niche
Keywords Plus: NEURAL PROGENITOR CELLS;CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM;EMBRYONIC STEM-CELLS;STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS;GROWTH-FACTOR;SUBVENTRICULAR ZONE;MAMMALIAN BRAIN;CEREBRAL-CORTEX;NEURONAL MIGRATION;NG2 PROTEOGLYCAN
Mesh headings: Intermediate Filament Proteins;Meninges;Microtubule-Associated Proteins;Nerve Tissue Proteins;Neuropeptides;Spinal Cord Injuries
Secondary Mesh headings: Adult Stem Cells;Animals;Cell Differentiation;Cell Movement;Cell Proliferation;Electrophysiologic Techniques, Cardiac;Gene Expression Profiling;Laminectomy;Lentivirus;Nestin;Neural Stem Cells;Neurogenesis;Oligodendroglia;Patch-Clamp Techniques;Rats;Rats, Sprague-Dawley;Regenerative Medicine;Stem Cell Niche
Issue Date: Dec-2011
Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL
Journal: Stem cells (Dayton, Ohio) 
Abstract: 
Adult spinal cord has little regenerative potential, thus limiting patient recovery following injury. In this study, we describe a new population of cells resident in the adult rat spinal cord meninges that express the neural stem/precursor markers nestin and doublecortin. Furthermore, from dissociated meningeal tissue a neural stem cell population was cultured in vitro and subsequently shown to differentiate into functional neurons or mature oligodendrocytes. Proliferation rate and number of nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells increased in vivo in meninges following spinal cord injury. By using a lentivirus-labeling approach, we show that meningeal cells, including nestin- and doublecortin-positive cells, migrate in the spinal cord parenchyma and contribute to the glial scar formation. Our data emphasize the multiple roles of meninges in the reaction of the parenchyma to trauma and indicate for the first time that spinal cord meninges are potential niches harboring stem/precursor cells that can be activated by injury. Meninges may be considered as a new source of adult stem/precursor cells to be further tested for use in regenerative medicine applied to neurological disorders, including repair from spinal cord injury.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12857/115177
ISSN: 10665099
DOI: 10.1002/stem.766
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