Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12857/116330
Title: Separating the Idea from the Action: A sLORETA Study
Authors: Rakusa, Martin
Busan, Pierpaolo 
Battaglini, Piero Paolo
Zidar, Janez
Keywords: Electroencephalography;Motor imagery;Reaching;Sensory-motor network;Standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography
Keywords Plus: ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX;POSTERIOR PARIETAL CORTEX;REACHING MOVEMENTS;HAND MOVEMENTS;BRAIN ACTIVITY;CHRONIC STROKE;IMAGINED HAND;MOTOR;FMRI;COGNITION
Mesh headings: Imagination;Motor Cortex;Movement;Parietal Lobe;Psychomotor Performance;Tomography
Secondary Mesh headings: Adult;Brain Mapping;Female;Humans;Male;Young Adult
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: SPRINGER
Journal: Brain topography 
Abstract: 
Simple imaginary movements activate similar cortical and subcortical areas to actual movements, chiefly in the sensory-motor network. However, only a few studies also examined the imagery of more skilful movements such as reaching. Ten volunteers performed reaching movements or imagined the same movements. EEG was simultaneously recorded and analysed with sLORETA, which compared the preparation for actual and imagined reaching with respect to their baseline and between tasks. Major differences between them were found at three time intervals after target presentation, always in favour of the actual reaching condition. The first one was from 160 to 220 msec in the frontal and parietal regions. The second difference was evident from 220 to 320 msec in the premotor cortex. The third difference was evident from 320 msec, mainly in the perirolandic region. Also, the anterior and posterior cingulate cortices were widely involved, in both tasks. We suggest the existence of two separate systems which may work together during actual reaching programming. The first one involves structures such as the premotor cortex, supplementary motor area and primary motor cortex, together with the parietal and occipital cortex. This system may integrate extrinsic target coordinates with proprioceptive information from the reaching arm and pre-stored programs in the associative motor cortex. It is activated strongly and involves more cortical areas in actual than imagined reaching. The second system, common to both tasks, involves anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, with the possible role of contributing awareness and focusing the various components of the process.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12857/116330
ISSN: 08960267
DOI: 10.1007/s10548-017-0584-9
Appears in Collections:Articles

Show full item record

PubMed Central
Citations 50

1
Last Week
0
Last month
0
checked on Dec 8, 2021

SCOPUSTM   
Citations 50

2
checked on Aug 31, 2020

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

2
checked on Dec 2, 2021

Page view(s) 10

1
checked on Dec 8, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.