Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12857/116506
Title: The role of implicit gender spatial stereotyping in mental rotation performance
Authors: Guizzo, Francesca
Moè, Angelica 
Cadinu, Mara 
Bertolli, Chiara
Keywords: Gender stereotyping;Implicit measures;Mental rotation;Spatial cognition
Keywords Plus: SEX-DIFFERENCES;INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES;ASSOCIATION TEST;WORKING-MEMORY;THREAT;MATH;ABILITY;WOMEN;GIRLS;METAANALYSIS
Mesh headings: Imaging, Three-Dimensional;Photic Stimulation;Sexism;Stereotyping;Thinking
Secondary Mesh headings: Adult;Female;Humans;Male;Rotation;Sex Factors;Young Adult
Issue Date: Mar-2019
Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Journal: Acta psychologica 
Abstract: 
Men outscore women in mental rotation. Among the possible explanations for this result are gender stereotypes. Research has shown that instructions confirming or disconfirming the gender stereotype that men are more talented than women may affect performance in some spatial tasks, such as mental rotation, but research so far has shown inconsistent or null results. However, no research to date has assessed whether participants' implicit associations linking men to spatial abilities may modulate these effects. Thus, the goal of this study was to assess the moderating role of the implicit gender spatial stereotyping, that is the automatic associations between men vs. women and space, in male and female participants receiving either stereotypical (stating that men outscore women) or stereotype-nullifying (stating that there is no gender difference) explicit instructions. Results confirmed that men performed better than women in mental rotation, but also showed that in the stereotype-nullifying condition, the higher the automatic associations between space and men the lower men's performance. The discussion focuses on the importance of considering implicit gender spatial stereotyping as a factor that can modulate mental rotation performance.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12857/116506
ISSN: 00016918
DOI: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2019.01.013
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