Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12857/126937
Title: Red blood cell distribution width in heart failure: A narrative review
Authors: Lippi, Giuseppe 
Turcato, Gianni 
Cervellin, Gianfranco 
Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian
Keywords: Erythrocytes;Heart disease;Heart failure;Mortality;Red blood cell distribution width
Keywords Plus: LIFETIME RISK;PREDICTS MORTALITY;LARGE COHORT;SURVIVAL;HOSPITALIZATION;ANEMIA;PREVALENCE;PROGNOSIS;EPIDEMIC;OUTCOMES
Issue Date: 26-Feb-2018
Publisher: BAISHIDENG PUBLISHING GROUP INC
Journal: World journal of cardiology 
Abstract: 
The red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a simple, rapid, inexpensive and straightforward hematological parameter, reflecting the degree of anisocytosis in vivo. The currently available scientific evidence suggests that RDW assessment not only predicts the risk of adverse outcomes (cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, hospitalization for acute decompensation or worsened left ventricular function) in patients with acute and chronic heart failure (HF), but is also a significant and independent predictor of developing HF in patients free of this condition. Regarding the biological interplay between impaired hematopoiesis and cardiac dysfunction, many of the different conditions associated with increased heterogeneity of erythrocyte volume (i.e., ageing, inflammation, oxidative stress, nutritional deficiencies and impaired renal function), may be concomitantly present in patients with HF, whilst anisocytosis may also directly contribute to the development and worsening of HF. In conclusion, the longitudinal assessment of RDW changes over time may be considered an efficient measure to help predicting the risk of both development and progression of HF.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12857/126937
ISSN: 1949-8462
DOI: 10.4330/wjc.v10.i2.6
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